Mental health, debt and ‘breathing space: what it all means.

The Money and Mental Health Policy Institute (started by Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert) have found data suggesting that 23,000 people in hospital for a mental health problem were being hounded by banks, credit card companies and local authorities for payment, despite their conditions.

Charities, like Mind and Rethink Mental Illness, are joining the MMHPI in calling for a ‘breathing space’ scheme whereby these organisations would stop charging people interest, charges and fees for a certain amount of time if they approached them for help and support.

As someone who’s been on the receiving end of banks and credit card company houndings, this is definitely good to hear. It should also be extended to those who have been diagnosed by their GP and going through treatment and Community Mental Health Teams too. Just because you’re at home, doesn’t mean you’re coping or dealing with life as well as you could be.

I used to do things like:

  • Ignore statements from the bank and hide them in the wardrobe
  • Not answer the phone for fear of it being the bank
  • Ring the bank for advice, listen to what they had to say, but not do any of it
  • Pay back some of my credit cards but re-spend again when I had no money
  • Go on a spending spree because I needed cheering up and not feel bad about it until I had to face the statements

It sucked. Royally. However, the bank did not help because:

  • They never asked why I was spending so much so quickly
  • They automatically increased the credit card limits so I would spend more money (I think this should stop happening as it’s taking advantage)
  • They never signposted me to any other agencies who could help

Back in December, I wrote a blog for the Huffington Post about what it was like having a mental health condition and being in debt. Many of you guys reading this may well have been in that position before, not wanting to face your money matters head on or worrying so much about them that you make yourself sick or have panic attacks.

To me, this ‘Breathing Space’ scheme seems like a positive move in bringing mental health and debt into the public eye and get people talking about it. Government now needs to listen. It could help so many people. It could ultimately save lives.

My advice if you’re in this debt spiral:

  • Don’t hide your bank statements
  • Ask a trusted family member or friend for help
  • Go to a charity like Mind or StepChange who can give you guidance or even Citizen’s Advice
  • Look up information on budgeting and see if you can give it a go
  • Cut up your credit cards
  • Give your debit card to a loved one and use cash

I’m slowly working myself out of my ‘bad debt’ (credit cards, overdrafts) so I can pay more off my ‘good debt’ (mortgage, house stuff) which is quite a nice feeling. I still don’t feel like I’m good with money but I’m getting better.

YOU CAN DO IT. You have the power to change things 🙂

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6 thoughts on “Mental health, debt and ‘breathing space: what it all means.

  1. I was an absolute ditto of what you would do when certain mail would come. Hide it, like that, makes it better. Duh? I love what you suggested here, very good tools. Now it’s just a matter if anyone will actually help the mentally ill with debt. I truly hope so, because I could use it too. 🙂
    Excellent entry! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much and you’re right. In a way, it’s great news for banks but morally it’s really wrong to almost exploit those whose minds aren’t in the right place to be dealing with payments and debt.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Received a pretty negative & shallow comment on here from someone called ‘Ronald MacDonald’… Looks like a lowlife spamming so watch your blog space ladies & gents!

    Like

  3. I love the breathing space idea! In Australia the utility companies are pretty good if you tell them you’re experiencing financial hardship or health issues that prevent you from working. I used to ignore bills and put them off when I was going through tough times but when I just decided to face it I was surprised at how some companies will help you out as long as you continue to communicate. I don’t think that applies to debt collectors though.. they are ruthless I hear.

    Liked by 1 person

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